asufilovesong:

vintageindianclothing:

Salwar-2
The caption for the second pic is informative - From Autumn 1956 collection of dresses designed from Indian materials by Chaunet. Miss Sheila modeling a Punjabi evening coat, with fly fastening, made in Dhariwal’s* tangerine velour; Punjabi evening kameez (with 6-panel flared skirt and ruckled sleeves; boat neckline) and salwar (cut on hip yoke with impressed pleats; tight ankles) executed from two Lal Imli’s* cashmere lohis.
*-see X.

I think this is a Dogri salwar / Dogri pajama. It starts loose and ends with the rings like a churidar-pajama.
Clearer in this picture  

Thanks for the addition!

asufilovesong:

vintageindianclothing:

Salwar-2

The caption for the second pic is informative - From Autumn 1956 collection of dresses designed from Indian materials by Chaunet. Miss Sheila modeling a Punjabi evening coat, with fly fastening, made in Dhariwal’s* tangerine velour; Punjabi evening kameez (with 6-panel flared skirt and ruckled sleeves; boat neckline) and salwar (cut on hip yoke with impressed pleats; tight ankles) executed from two Lal Imli’s* cashmere lohis.

*-see X.

I think this is a Dogri salwar / Dogri pajama. It starts loose and ends with the rings like a churidar-pajama.

Clearer in this picture  

Thanks for the addition!

Reblogged from asufilovesong

Salwar-2
The caption for the second pic is informative - From Autumn 1956 collection of dresses designed from Indian materials by Chaunet. Miss Sheila modeling a Punjabi evening coat, with fly fastening, made in Dhariwal’s* tangerine velour; Punjabi evening kameez (with 6-panel flared skirt and ruckled sleeves; boat neckline) and salwar (cut on hip yoke with impressed pleats; tight ankles) executed from two Lal Imli’s* cashmere lohis.
*-see X.

Salwar-2

The caption for the second pic is informative - From Autumn 1956 collection of dresses designed from Indian materials by Chaunet. Miss Sheila modeling a Punjabi evening coat, with fly fastening, made in Dhariwal’s* tangerine velour; Punjabi evening kameez (with 6-panel flared skirt and ruckled sleeves; boat neckline) and salwar (cut on hip yoke with impressed pleats; tight ankles) executed from two Lal Imli’s* cashmere lohis.

*-see X.

Personal Notes

I will stop with the 50s here. Though there is so much material you could start a 1950s India tumblr and find enough material to keep it going for a long time.

Just a note. I don’t make any money from this tumblr - or leverage it in any way - and that’s fine by me. I enjoy doing it and if people learn something from it and go off and do their own projects that’s fine by me. But please please do credit any material that you use from here! Some of the images and 100% of the written material is mine.  Plus some of the posts are extremely difficult to do and require a lot of research.  The ongoing one on each decade for e.g. I write from scratch because there is literally very little mapping fashions in each decade. I use about 30-40% of my material for posts (because else it would get too boring and obsessive) so well it requires a lot sifting, pruning aka loads of work! And as a scientist, I can say that all the pleasure is in writing a paper and being cited :-) So please do cite the blog if you use any material!

The 1950s was the first decade of India as an independent, sovereign country.  After the excitement of the 30s and 40s, it is a decade in which the excitement lies in nation-building.  This was a decade of nationalisation in which a number of institutions and projects (e.g. State Bank of India (1955), Bhakra Dam (1955), HMT (1953)) were initiated and the making of a national identity was seriously underway. A browse though the photodivision site will indicate many visits by foreign dignitaries - Khrushchev, Eisenhower, Zhou-enlai,  Che, Jesse Owens all visited. The decade marked the beginning of the Republic Day parade intended to showcase India’s varied and differing cultures as well as culture as a national project, e.g. the Lalit Kala Academy came into existence in 1954.
India had its first general elections in 1951/52. It set in motion a one-party rule at the centre that only changed in 1977.
1951 onwards we had Five Year Plans, based on the then Soviet Union’s planning model.
1953 marked the beginning of states based on linguistic considerations with the creation of the then Seemandhra leading to the States Reorganisation Act. By the end of the decade, Bombay State split into two to form Gujarat and Maharashtra.
The Hindu Marriage Act intended to bring about reform was enacted in 1955. Amongst other things it increased the legal age of marriage and introduced inheritance for daughters.
In 1956, Dr. BR Ambedkar along with many of his followers publicly converted to Buddhism. 
India was not the only country to free itself from colonialism. The 1955 Bandung Conference brought together several of these countries in Asia and Africa with the intent of economic co-operation and to oppose colonialism.
Independent India got it’s first woman IAS officer in 1951 (X), sadly she now seems to be living in the outhouse of her own home.
In 1959, Arati Saha became the first Indian woman to cross the English Channel [X] [X].
_________________________________________________________
At the end of the 1940s India was dependent on imports for many materials. This didn’t change in some areas but textiles of the non-handloom kind were increasingly made in India. You can see this in clothing of the time, with art silk, rayon, georgette and nylon becoming more readily available.
The arts - and in particular the movies - brought about an “Indian look”. While regional differences remained, what we wore was increasingly similar across states, be it the sari or the salwar kameex. The six yard sari drape we are familiar with kind of became the “Indian look” in this decade including longer more Indian hairstyles, the bindi and the gajra. 
Usually I try and include a piece on an actress of the decade. But this decade has a long list of well known actresses who are still remembered, amongst them Meena Kumari, Madhubala, Nargis, Vyjayanthimala, Suchitra Sen, Savithri, Bhanumati, so I will pass. Though Bhanumathi gets a honourable mention as a writer, actress, producer and director which was rather unusual for the decade. This was also a decade of strong roles for women, even when the roles are cast in the “ideal Indian womanhood” mould.
Need to know more? Follow 1950s; sari history.
Year of photograph: 1956.

The 1950s was the first decade of India as an independent, sovereign country.  After the excitement of the 30s and 40s, it is a decade in which the excitement lies in nation-building.  This was a decade of nationalisation in which a number of institutions and projects (e.g. State Bank of India (1955), Bhakra Dam (1955), HMT (1953)) were initiated and the making of a national identity was seriously underway. A browse though the photodivision site will indicate many visits by foreign dignitaries - Khrushchev, Eisenhower, Zhou-enlaiChe, Jesse Owens all visited. The decade marked the beginning of the Republic Day parade intended to showcase India’s varied and differing cultures as well as culture as a national project, e.g. the Lalit Kala Academy came into existence in 1954.

India had its first general elections in 1951/52. It set in motion a one-party rule at the centre that only changed in 1977.

1951 onwards we had Five Year Plans, based on the then Soviet Union’s planning model.

1953 marked the beginning of states based on linguistic considerations with the creation of the then Seemandhra leading to the States Reorganisation Act. By the end of the decade, Bombay State split into two to form Gujarat and Maharashtra.

The Hindu Marriage Act intended to bring about reform was enacted in 1955. Amongst other things it increased the legal age of marriage and introduced inheritance for daughters.

In 1956, Dr. BR Ambedkar along with many of his followers publicly converted to Buddhism

India was not the only country to free itself from colonialism. The 1955 Bandung Conference brought together several of these countries in Asia and Africa with the intent of economic co-operation and to oppose colonialism.

Independent India got it’s first woman IAS officer in 1951 (X), sadly she now seems to be living in the outhouse of her own home.

In 1959, Arati Saha became the first Indian woman to cross the English Channel [X] [X].

_________________________________________________________

At the end of the 1940s India was dependent on imports for many materials. This didn’t change in some areas but textiles of the non-handloom kind were increasingly made in India. You can see this in clothing of the time, with art silk, rayon, georgette and nylon becoming more readily available.

The arts - and in particular the movies - brought about an “Indian look”. While regional differences remained, what we wore was increasingly similar across states, be it the sari or the salwar kameex. The six yard sari drape we are familiar with kind of became the “Indian look” in this decade including longer more Indian hairstyles, the bindi and the gajra

Usually I try and include a piece on an actress of the decade. But this decade has a long list of well known actresses who are still remembered, amongst them Meena Kumari, Madhubala, Nargis, Vyjayanthimala, Suchitra Sen, Savithri, Bhanumati, so I will pass. Though Bhanumathi gets a honourable mention as a writer, actress, producer and director which was rather unusual for the decade. This was also a decade of strong roles for women, even when the roles are cast in the “ideal Indian womanhood” mould.

Need to know more? Follow 1950s; sari history.

Year of photograph: 1956.

Anonymous asked:

Thank you, that made things alot clear and about Pallava Dynasty i was talking about sculpture relief of "Mahendravarman with his two wives" in Mahabalipuram & both queens seem to wearing a headdress similar to female Kutiyattam dancers so i assumed it was similar to that.

No worries. Ah I see - I went and had a look at the images and I see what you mean!

Anonymous asked:

I was reading "A Forgotten Empire - Vijayanagar" & this Portuguese traveler gives a very vivid details on medieval womens clothing during Vijayanagar Empire. I would appreciate it if you could break it down on what kind of headdress he was talking about? as the author also seems baffled about it but i keep imaging it as something similar from Pallava Dynasty. chapter 17, page 111 & 112

vintageindianclothing answered:

and behind these women will come some twenty women-porters, with canes in their hands all covered with silver, and close to them come women clothed in the following manner. They have very rich and fine silk cloths; on the head they wear high caps which they call COLLAES,[448]

Hi Anon, I had a look at the book on archive and got a little confused as pages 111-112 don’t seem to refer to headgear. Chapter XVII around page 252 (Narrative of Paes) makes reference to male headgear from a very quick read. At page 273 there is a reference to the high cap called collae on women (quoted above). The note below says this refers to Kullayi in Telugu and was likely a man’s headdress.

From a few paintings and Krishnadevaraya's statue at Tirupati (X, X), we know that men wore a particular kind of headdress (also see X). Kamat’s says this is the kulavi so I assume this is what the women wore.  Normally women’s hairstyles from this time are probably similar to those seen in Lepakshi paintings.

If you are referring to another page, let me know.

At this point Vijayanagara was influential in South India and the Pallavas barely around.  I assume you are referring to the earlier Pallava dynasty?
Lastly thank you for the link. The book is interesting and I am certainly going to be reading it.

doriansennui:

vintageindianclothing:

doriansennui:

Are the statues in Tirupati located inside the temple complex? I can’t remember ever seeing them or having heard them mentioned before…

I am not sure where they are located. The images are from here and here. The second link says at the portals of the temple.

What’s interesting is that recently commissioned statues completely depart from this, it’s like some manufactured medieval pan Indian king costume:)

Wow, talk about a re-invention of style. Is it somebody taking artistic license or a political move to create, as you said, a “pan-Indian” ruler? Hmmm…well, I have vowed not to stand in queues at the temple ever again,  but I will try to keep an eye out for the statues the next time we’re in Tirupati. 

Partly ignorance I think, partly a conflating of various periods and kingdoms to give a pan-Indian Hindu look or in this case South of the Vindhyas look. 

Even though there is an abundance of statuary in the country which make very clear the costumes of Indian kingdoms, we don’t really depict these in modern times. So say a stage drama will make Vijayanagara vaguely suggestive of the Marathas. Maybe we feel uneasy with the kind of clothing ancient and medieval Indians wore, it’s almost like we still have the Victorian mindset (Brits, you have a lot to answer for!!). Paes on the other hand (the Portuguese writer who visited Vijayanagara) is in raptures about the clothing and jewels.

Ages since I have been to Tirupati myself. There are so many quiet, beautiful temples that lie neglected that I skip the popular ones.

Anonymous asked:

I was reading "A Forgotten Empire - Vijayanagar" & this Portuguese traveler gives a very vivid details on medieval womens clothing during Vijayanagar Empire. I would appreciate it if you could break it down on what kind of headdress he was talking about? as the author also seems baffled about it but i keep imaging it as something similar from Pallava Dynasty. chapter 17, page 111 & 112

vintageindianclothing answered:

and behind these women will come some twenty women-porters, with canes in their hands all covered with silver, and close to them come women clothed in the following manner. They have very rich and fine silk cloths; on the head they wear high caps which they call COLLAES,[448]

Hi Anon, I had a look at the book on archive and got a little confused as pages 111-112 don’t seem to refer to headgear. Chapter XVII around page 252 (Narrative of Paes) makes reference to male headgear from a very quick read. At page 273 there is a reference to the high cap called collae on women (quoted above). The note below says this refers to Kullayi in Telugu and was likely a man’s headdress.

From a few paintings and Krishnadevaraya's statue at Tirupati (X, X), we know that men wore a particular kind of headdress (also see X). Kamat’s says this is the kulavi so I assume this is what the women wore.  Normally women’s hairstyles from this time are probably similar to those seen in Lepakshi paintings.

If you are referring to another page, let me know.

At this point Vijayanagara was influential in South India and the Pallavas barely around.  I assume you are referring to the earlier Pallava dynasty?
Lastly thank you for the link. The book is interesting and I am certainly going to be reading it.

doriansennui:

Are the statues in Tirupati located inside the temple complex? I can’t remember ever seeing them or having heard them mentioned before…

I am not sure where they are located. The images are from here and here. The second link says at the portals of the temple.

What’s interesting is that recently commissioned statues completely depart from this, it’s like some manufactured medieval pan Indian king costume:)

Anonymous asked:

I was reading "A Forgotten Empire - Vijayanagar" & this Portuguese traveler gives a very vivid details on medieval womens clothing during Vijayanagar Empire. I would appreciate it if you could break it down on what kind of headdress he was talking about? as the author also seems baffled about it but i keep imaging it as something similar from Pallava Dynasty. chapter 17, page 111 & 112

and behind these women will come some twenty women-porters, with canes in their hands all covered with silver, and close to them come women clothed in the following manner. They have very rich and fine silk cloths; on the head they wear high caps which they call COLLAES,[448]

Hi Anon, I had a look at the book on archive and got a little confused as pages 111-112 don’t seem to refer to headgear. Chapter XVII around page 252 (Narrative of Paes) makes reference to male headgear from a very quick read. At page 273 there is a reference to the high cap called collae on women (quoted above). The note below says this refers to Kullayi in Telugu and was likely a man’s headdress.

From a few paintings and Krishnadevaraya's statue at Tirupati (X, X), we know that men wore a particular kind of headdress (also see X). Kamat’s says this is the kulavi so I assume this is what the women wore.  Normally women’s hairstyles from this time are probably similar to those seen in Lepakshi paintings.

If you are referring to another page, let me know.

At this point Vijayanagara was influential in South India and the Pallavas barely around.  I assume you are referring to the earlier Pallava dynasty?
Lastly thank you for the link. The book is interesting and I am certainly going to be reading it.

Anonymous asked:

I thought i would share something on petticoat, My family is from Mysore & my mother has few saris handed down from her mother & grand-mother which are very long (12yard) & wide for modern standards & they are all paired with a brocade lungi that are to be worn under neath sari as traditional Mysore style was just too ridiculously long with tons of pleating (very temple style) so the sari was tucked into oddiyana while walking so lungi underneath served as form of decorative petticoat.

Thanks for the info Anon. I have often wondered about exactly how long the Mysore sari was.  And how one walked in it - it’s interesting that they had a decorative petticoat.

For those of you who may not be aware of the Mysore style, here is an e.g.